A seedling with lineage dating back to the American Revolution comes to live in Dalton today.

The seedling, grown from seeds harvested from one of the original “Liberty Trees” that served as meeting points for the Sons of Liberty revolutionaries seeking independence, will be planted during a 1 p.m. ceremony at City Hall.

There was a Liberty Tree in each of the 13 original colonies, although some of the “trees” were actually poles, such as Georgia’s original “tree” in Savannah.

Seeds for Dalton’s Liberty Tree were taken from the last remaining original Liberty Tree, a tulip poplar that stood on the campus of St. John’s College in Annapolis, Md. The tree was cut down in 1999 after it was severely damaged by Hurricane Floyd.

American Forests, a conservation group based in Washington, D.C., took seeds from the Annapolis tree and planted them in its Historic Tree Nursery.

Another group, The Providence Forum, a nonprofit organization dedicated to the values of the nation’s founding fathers, purchased the seedlings from American Forests and grew them in Delaware with the intention of delivering one to each of the 13 original colonies, according to Ralf Augstroze, executive director of Providence Forum.

The Dalton tree could grow up to 100 feet tall and live as long as 400 years, according to Dalton arborist and city landscape director Kris Thomas.

Dalton was chosen as the site for the tree in Georgia because of the city’s commitment to its Tree City USA program and the diligence of Thomas and the Dalton Tree Board, according to Ethan Kearns with American Forests.

“We’re really excited,” said Dalton Mayor Ray Elrod. “I can’t say enough about the Tree Board and Kris Thomas and Paul Buchanan, especially. Also, years ago former councilman Harlan Godfrey had the idea of doing this. They really put Dalton on the map as far as Tree City USA goes. All the thanks goes to them and the Tree Board.”

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