Editor’s note: “In Other News” is a list of state, national and global headlines compiled by the Daily Citizen-News staff. Click on the headline to read these stories. To suggest a story, email the appropriate link to inothernews@daltoncitizen.com. The deadline is 3 p.m. 

Colorado boy, 8, injured in mountain lion attack describes encounter: 'I tried to get it in the eye'

The 8-year-old Colorado boy severely injured in a mountain lion attack said he tried to fight off the animal with a stick. Pike Carlson talked this week about his scary encounter with the mountain lion, which took place last month in his backyard in Bailey, according to reports. “I was just punching, trying to grab anything that I can, like a stick,” Pike told KUSA-TV. “I did find a stick, and I tried to get it in the eye but soon the stick snapped.” Pike’s father ran to his son and scared off the 65-pound mountain lion. — Fox News

Using mouthwash after exercise has this bizarre effect on blood pressure, study claims

Using mouthwash after exercising could negatively impact the cardiovascular benefits of working out, particularly lowering blood pressure, a new study claims. The findings, published in Free Radical Biology and Medicine and led by researchers at the University of Plymouth in England, detail how using mouthwash after working out can prevent your body from reaching — and staying — in a low blood pressure range for a period of time post-exercise. Exercise has long been known to reduce blood pressure, though how exactly blood pressure levels stay low for hours after exercise has been a source of much debate. For the study, which focused on the role of oral bacteria in reducing blood pressure following exercise, 23 healthy adults were asked to run on the treadmill for two 30-minute sessions. After working out, participants were monitored for two hours. — Fox News

America’s aging population is leading to a doctor shortage crisis

As America’s population ages and demand outpaces supply, a physician shortage is intensifying. Projections from the Association of American Medical Colleges say the U.S. will see a shortage of 46,900 to 121,900 physicians by 2032 in primary and specialty care. The aging of America’s population is slicing the health-care industry in multiple ways. Americans are living longer and seemingly healthier lives — and requiring more care later into life. What’s more, one-third of all doctors currently working will be older than 65 in the next decade, and retirements may squeeze supply. — CNBC

Three more deaths and at least 450 illnesses linked to vaping nationwide

Officials on Friday in Indiana, California and Minnesota reported deaths in their states linked to vaping. Previous deaths have been reported in Illinois and Oregon. Indiana health officials confirmed a patient died from a severe lung injury; Minnesota health officials linked a death in August to electronic cigarettes and Los Angeles health officials recorded the state's first vaping-related death.  Nationwide, U.S. health officials said Friday that they're now investigating more than 450 cases of possible vaping-related illnesses in 33 states. — CBS News

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