Black couple's daring escape from slavery marked in London

A Black couple who escaped slavery in the U.S. state of Georgia and fled to Britain to campaign for abolition have been honored with a historic plaque on their home in London. English Heritage on Tuesday marked the accomplishments of Ellen and William Craft with a blue plaque outside the two-story brick row house in the Hammersmith area of West London from which they campaigned for the end of slavery. The couple escaped slavery in 1848 when Ellen, the light-skinned daughter of a Black woman raped by her enslaver, disguised herself as a disabled white man traveling north for medical treatment. William accompanied her, posing as her servant. After their former enslavers sent bounty hunters to capture the Crafts, the couple left their home in Boston and fled to Britain. Once overseas, the couple lectured widely and helped set up the London Emancipation Society, which campaigned for the abolition of slavery.

Ex-Facebook employee says products hurt kids, fuel division

A former Facebook data scientist told Congress on Tuesday that the social network giant’s products harm children and fuel polarization in the U.S. while its executives refuse to make changes because they elevate profits over safety. Frances Haugen testified to the Senate Commerce Subcommittee on Consumer Protection. She is accusing the company of being aware of apparent harm to some teens from Instagram and being dishonest in its public fight against hate and misinformation. Haugen has come forward with a wide-ranging condemnation of Facebook, buttressed with tens of thousands of pages of internal research documents she secretly copied before leaving her job in the company's civic integrity unit. She also has filed complaints with federal authorities alleging that Facebook’s own research shows that it amplifies hate, misinformation and political unrest, but the company hides what it knows.

Vaccines are here. School's open. Some parents still agonize

PHOENIX — Eight days into the school year, all five of Amber Cessac’s daughters, ages 4 to 10, had tested positive for COVID-19. Having them all sick at once and worrying about long-term repercussions as other parents at their school, and even her own mother, downplayed the virus, “broke something inside of me,” Cessac said. “The anxiety and the stress has sort of been bottled up,” she said. “It just felt so, I don’t know, defeating and made me feel so helpless.” Like parents everywhere, Cessac has been dealing with pandemic stress for over 18 months now. There's the exhaustion of worrying about the disease itself— made worse by the spread of the more infectious delta variant, particularly among people who refuse vaccinations, which has caused a big increase in infections in children. Online school disrupted kids' educations and parents' work.

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