Editor’s note: “In Other News” is a list of state, national and global headlines compiled by the Daily Citizen-News staff. Click on the headlines below to read the full stories. To suggest a story, email the appropriate link to inothernews@dailycitizen.news 

A black moon is coming on Wednesday. Here's what that means

So you've heard of a blood moon, and maybe even a blue moon, but what about a black moon? The phenomenon is occurring again in North America on Wednesday — the first one since 2016. The rest of the world will have to wait until Aug. 30. But, what does this even mean? Why is it important? — CNN

A teacher dug up a 2.12-carat diamond — and learned how much gems are really worth

Josh Lanik's family was ready to give up. The gem-hunting novices were "over" their search at Arkansas' Crater of Diamonds State Park after a hot morning with nothing to show but rocks and glass, Lanik told The Washington Post. Everyone thought it was time for lunch. Then, the Nebraska teacher stumbled on a shiny brown stone about the size of a jelly bean. He plucked the stone from the gravel and took it back to the Murfreesboro park's offices, making sure to put it in his bag rather than his pockets on the advice of park staff, who had seen many visitors lose their precious finds. A woman took the gem into a backroom in a pill bottle. She emerged with a smile on her face, Lanik recalled. — Houston Chronicle

California professors install seesaws along U.S.-Mexico border wall

Two California professors created seesaws at the United States-Mexico border wall to allow children in both countries to play with each other. Ronald Rael, an architecture professor at the University of California, Berkeley, and Virginia San Fratello, an assistant professor at San José State University in California, came up with the idea for a "Teetertotter Wall" in 2009. Their idea finally came to life at an event Monday in Sunland Park, New Mexico, when three bright pink seesaws or teeter-totters were added to the giant steel border wall. The contraptions, typically found at a children's playground, stretch into Ciudad Juárez, Mexico. — NBC News

From 'Pink Lady Bandit' to 'Attila the Bun,' here's why the FBI nicknames bank robbers

The Bad-Breath Bandit. The Barefoot Burglar. Attila the Bun. And now the Pink Lady Bandit: All of them captured, investigators say, due in no small part to their nicknames. It's common for the FBI to call unidentified serial robbers by descriptive, often silly, monikers. And while the names certainly make for a colorful directory of criminals, they're also important tools that help agents crack a case. Nicknames help investigators ID nameless perps and generate publicity that can aid in their capture, retired FBI special agent Harry Trombitas said. — CNN

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