Georgia regents: No college name changes over racial history

Georgia's public university system won't rename any of the 75 buildings or colleges an internal committee had recommended for changes mostly because of their association with slavery, segregation or mistreatment of American Indians, officials voted Monday. The system's regents voted not to make any name changes, more than a year after they established a committee to study that issue. "History can teach us important lessons, lessons that if understood and applied make Georgia and its people stronger," the regents said in a statement unanimously adopted by the board at a specially called meeting. The regents added that while the board would not pursue name changes involving the buildings and colleges as recommended by the advisory group’s report, it acknowledged there were many viewpoints on the matter. 

Political fight in Georgia suburbs as McBath jumps districts

Georgia U.S. Rep. Lucy McBath isn't going away, even as Republicans try to draw district lines to pry back a slice of the American suburbs from congressional Democrats. McBath, a Democrat who in 2018 wrested away Newt Gingrich's old suburban Atlanta U.S. House district from the GOP, is a torchbearer for the Democratic insurgency into once-prime Republican territory. Georgia's GOP-controlled General Assembly responded by drawing a much more Republican 6th Congressional District for McBath, a former flight attendant who rose to prominence as a gun control activist after her son was fatally shot at a Florida gas station in a dispute over loud music. But even as the state House pushed through the new plan on a mostly party-line vote, McBath announced Monday that she was jumping to a different suburban Atlanta district, this one drawn to heavily favor Democrats. She's telling supporters that her mission is too important to step aside.

'Mama, are you OK?' In Waukesha, minutes of terror recounted

Hours before it started, they were already there — people sitting on lawn chairs or wrapped in blankets, awaiting an event the city's mayor described as straight out of Norman Rockwell. The Waukesha Christmas Parade, a tradition in its Milwaukee suburb for six decades, was to be particularly special this time around after its pandemic-related cancellation last year. Stepping off a few blocks to the east, parade participants were in the holiday spirit, too. Members of the Milwaukee Dancing Grannies, a crowd favorite on the Wisconsin parade circuit, donned white fur hats and waved white pompoms as they danced down Main Street to “Jingle Bell Rock.” Realtors and bankers handed out candy, and the percussion section of a high school band wore Santa hats as they banged drums and clanged cymbals. As they reveled, a red SUV was also heading down Main Street behind them, moving at a pace far faster than the parade.

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