Harry Potter books removed from Tennessee school due to 'curses and spells'

The students at St. Edward Catholic School in Nashville can no longer check out the popular Harry Potter book series from their school's library. The seven-book series depicting the magical adventures of a young wizard and his friends was removed from the library because of their content, the Rev. Dan Reehil, a pastor at the Roman Catholic parish school, wrote in an email. "These books present magic as both good and evil, which is not true, but in fact a clever deception. The curses and spells used in the books are actual curses and spells; which when read by a human being risk conjuring evil spirits into the presence of the person reading the text," the email states. — The Tennessean

Beyond Meat uses climate change to market fake meat substitutes. Scientists are cautious

As concerns mount over the dangers of a rapidly warming planet, upstart food companies are targeting a major climate-damaging food: beef. Beyond Meat and its privately held rival Impossible Foods have recently grabbed headlines and fast-food deals for their plant-based burgers that imitate the taste of beef. They’ve also turned the environmental benefits of abstaining from meat into a key marketing tool for their products — drawing some skepticism from environmental researchers who say plant diets are healthier and less carbon emitting than producing processed plant-based products. — CNBC

These 9 cars are about to disappear from dealer lots after being discontinued

Had your heart set on a Chevrolet Volt? Been eyeing a Toyota Prius C? Always wanted a Buick LaCrosse? Better act fast. Those vehicles are among a handful of models that are disappearing quickly after automakers recently announced decisions to discontinue them and several other poorly selling cars. — USA Today

‘This will teach you next time,’ 911 dispatcher told Arkansas woman who later drowned

It was still dark out in Fort Smith, Arkansas, as Debbie Stevens tended to her newspaper delivery route as she had for more than 20 years. That’s when her gray Mazda SUV was swept up by quickly rising floodwaters from heavy rainfall. She first called her mother-in-law, who was also driving a paper route, but hung up and called 911 at 4:38 a.m., as the water rose to her car window. Stevens, 47, spent the next 22 minutes on the phone with an emergency dispatcher frantically pleading for help and saying that she could not swim. The dispatcher, Donna Reneau, repeatedly told a sobbing Stevens to calm down. “This will teach you next time, don’t drive in the water,” she said, according to a recording of the call that was released by the police. “You put yourself in danger,” she added. Stevens drowned in her vehicle on Aug. 24 before emergency responders reached her, according to a police statement. — The New York Times

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