On TV, 9/11 was last huge story for ‘Big 3’ network anchors

“Turn on your television.” Those words were repeated in millions of homes on Sept. 11, 2001. Friends and relatives took to the telephone: Something awful was happening. You have to see. Before social media and with online news in its infancy, the story of the day when terrorists killed nearly 3,000 people unfolded primarily on television. Even some people inside New York's World Trade Center made the phone call. They felt a shudder, could smell smoke. Could someone watch the news and find out what was happening? Most Americans were guided through the unimaginable by one of three anchors: Tom Brokaw of NBC News, Peter Jennings of ABC and Dan Rather of CBS. “They were the closest thing that America had to national leaders on 9/11,” says Garrett Graff, author of “The Only Plane in the Sky,” an oral history of the attack. “They were the moral authority for the country on that first day, fulfilling a very historical role of basically counseling the country through this tragedy at a moment its political leadership was largely silent and largely absent from the conversation.” The news media has changed in the ensuing 20 years, and some experts believe the same story would feel even more chaotic and terrifying if it broke today. But on that day, when America faced the worst of humanity, it had three newsmen at the peak of their powers.

Georgians to be able to carry driver's license on phone

ATLANTA — Georgia is set to become one of the first states to allow driver's licenses to be carried on smart phones. The exact timeline hasn't been announced but the state's drivers will be among the earliest to be able to use the Apple Wallet app to store their license or state ID card on an iPhone, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported. The state is also working on a similar option for Android phones, according to the Department of Driver Services. Department Commissioner Spencer Moore said in a news release that the state is “a national leader when it comes to the safety and security of its driver and identity credentialing process.”

Virginia is set to remove Richmond's Lee statue today

RICHMOND, Va. — A towering statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee in Richmond, Virginia, will be taken down on Wednesday as a symbol of racial injustice, more than 130 years after it was erected in tribute to the South’s Civil War leader. While many other Confederate symbols across the South have been removed without public announcements beforehand to avoid unruly crowds, Gov. Ralph Northam's office is expecting a multitude and plans to livestream the event on social media. The imposing, 21-foot tall bronze likeness of Lee on a horse sits atop a granite pedestal nearly twice that high in the grassy center of a traffic circle on Richmond’s famed Monument Avenue.

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