Robots hit the streets as demand for food delivery grows

Robot food delivery is no longer the stuff of science fiction. But you may not see it in your neighborhood anytime soon. Hundreds of little robots — knee-high and able to hold around four large pizzas — are now navigating college campuses and even some city sidewalks in the U.S., the U.K. and elsewhere. While robots were being tested in limited numbers before the coronavirus hit, the companies building them say pandemic-related labor shortages and a growing preference for contactless delivery have accelerated their deployment. “We saw demand for robot usage just go through the ceiling,” said Alastair Westgarth, the CEO of Starship Technologies, which recently completed its 2 millionth delivery. “I think demand was always there, but it was brought forward by the pandemic effect." Starship has more than 1,000 robots in its fleet, up from just 250 in 2019. Hundreds more will be deployed soon. They're delivering food on 20 U.S. campuses; 25 more will be added soon. They're also operating on sidewalks in Milton Keynes, England; Modesto, California; and the company’s hometown of Tallin, Estonia.

Georgia official: Trump call to 'find' votes was a threat

Donald Trump was threatening Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger when he asked him to help “find” enough votes to overturn his loss in Georgia to Democratic President Joe Biden, Raffensperger writes in a new book. The book, “Integrity Counts,” was released Tuesday. In it, Raffensperger depicts a man who defied pressure from Trump to alter election results, but also reveals a public official settling political scores as he seeks to survive a hostile Republican primary environment and win reelection in 2022. An engineer who grew wealthy before running for office, Raffensperger recounts in his book the struggle in Georgia that followed Biden's narrow victory, including death threats texted to his wife, an encounter with men who he says may have been staking out his suburban Atlanta home, and being escorted out of the Georgia capitol on Jan. 6 as a handful of right-wing protesters entered the building on the same day many more protesters stormed the U.S. Capitol.

Why Arbery slaying video will be 'star witness'

BRUNSWICK — It's hard to overstate the importance of the video recording of Ahmaud Arbery's death and the evidentiary weight that the short, sometimes shaky clip will carry at the trial of the three men who chased and shot him. “You've got a cellphone video as your star witness,” said Jeffrey Abramson, a law professor at the University of Texas, “and a relatively small community where virtually everyone has seen or heard about the video.” In fact, without the video, it's possible there would have been no criminal charges, and thus no trial, in the 25-year-old Black man's slaying on Feb. 23, 2020. Father and son Greg and Travis McMichael and their neighbor, William “Roddie" Bryan, were initially questioned and released by police and remained free for more than two months after Arbery was shot on a residential street.

React to this story:

0
0
0
0
0

Trending Video