Editor’s note: “In Other News” is a list of state, national and global headlines compiled by the Daily Citizen-News staff. Click on the headlines below to read the full stories. To suggest a story, email the appropriate link to inothernews@dailycitizen.news 

Trump administration scores win over challenge to asylum restriction

A federal judge decided Wednesday to leave in place a Trump administration rule that imposes restrictions on individuals seeking asylum in the United States if they passed through a third country on their way to the border between the U.S. and Mexico, potentially leading to a sharp reduction in Central American migrants entering the country. The rule, published in the Federal Register last week, requires people seeking asylum to first apply in one of the countries they pass through on their way to the U.S., with certain exceptions. The rule was quickly met with a legal challenge from advocacy groups, who moved for a temporary restraining order blocking the rule. After a hearing in Washington, D.C. federal court, District Judge Timothy J. Kelly denied the motion. The rule will remain in place for the duration of the case, unless the decision is successfully appealed. — Fox News

Alongside a $5 billion fine, the US government just imposed a bunch of restrictions on what Facebook can and can't do

It's official: Facebook was hit with a $5 billion fine from the Federal Trade Commission as part of a settlement over claims the company mishandled user data. The fine is a record for the FTC — perhaps a precedent for the kind of punishment that tech giants could expect for mishandling users' data — and is a direct response to the Cambridge Analytica scandal, in which data from more than 50 million Facebook users was improperly obtained by a political data-analytics firm. The data was then used by the firm, Cambridge Analytica, to target American voters in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Beyond the record fine, the FTC is also imposing a set of regulations on Facebook aimed at protecting user data. — Business Insider

Attorney General Barr targets Facebook, Google and Amazon in broad antitrust probe

The Justice Department has opened a broad antitrust inquiry into whether Silicon Valley giants are unlawfully stifling competition. The announcement under Attorney General William Barr confirms that Facebook, Google and Amazon are all in the crosshairs, significantly ratcheting up the pressure on Big Tech as lawmakers also conduct their own hearings into issues of privacy, hate speech and content moderation. — Fox News

School district that warned parents of foster care wouldn't let CEO erase lunch debts, he says

A Pennsylvania school district that warned parents that unpaid lunch fees could lead to their children being placed in foster care rejected a businessman's offer to clear the debts, a Philadelphia CEO said. La Colombe Coffee CEO Todd Carmichael said the Wyoming Valley West School Board's president on Monday told him "no" when he offered to give the district $22,000 to cover the outstanding debts. Carmichael said in a letter obtained by NBC News that he received free meals at school when he was a child and was "horrified" when he heard of the threatening letters, which were sent to parents and demanded they pay up or risk having their children placed in foster care. — NBC News

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