Viral App FaceApp now owns access to more than 150 million people's faces and names

Everyone's seen them: friends posting pictures of themselves now, and years in the future Viral app FaceApp has been giving people the power to change their facial expressions, looks, and now age for several years. But at the same time, people have been giving FaceApp the power to use their pictures — and names — for any purpose it wishes, for as long as it desires. And we thought we learned a lesson from Cambridge Analytica. — Forbes

From Kellyanne Conway to Stephen Miller, Trump’s advisers face taunts from hecklers around D.C.

For any new presidential team, the challenges of adapting to Washington include navigating a capital with its own unceasing rhythms and high-pitched atmospherics, not to mention a maze of madness-inducing traffic circles. Yet for employees of Donald Trump — the most combative president of the modern era, a man who exists in his own tweet-driven ecosystem — the challenges are magnified exponentially, particularly in a predominantly Democratic city where he won only 4% of the vote. — The Washington Post

Emails show Iowa official’s Tupac fixation before his ouster

The director of Iowa’s social services agency was a huge fan of the late rapper Tupac Shakur, and he frequently let his subordinates know it. Emails obtained by The Associated Press show that Iowa Department of Human Services Director Jerry Foxhoven routinely sent messages to employees lauding Shakur’s music and lyrics even after at least one complained to lawmakers. Then last month, he sent another such email to all 4,300 agency employees. He was abruptly ousted from his job the next work day. Foxhoven, 66, told employees that he had been a huge fan of the hip-hop artist for years. He hosted weekly “Tupac Fridays” to play his music in the office. He traded lyrics with employees and he marked his own 65th birthday with Shakur-themed cookies, including ones decorated with the words “Thug life.” —The Associated Press

No more 'manholes': Berkeley, California, removing all gendered language from city code

Berkeley, California, a city with a long history of progressivism, is moving forward with a plan to remove all gendered language from its city code as part of an effort to recognize its nonbinary residents. Soon, in the Bay Area city just east of San Francisco, all instances of "he" and "she" in the city code will replaced by the gender-neutral "they." The City Council on Tuesday adopted the first reading of the new ordinance eliminating "gender preference language" in its municipal code. — NBC News

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