US food banks struggle to feed hungry amid surging prices

U.S. food banks already dealing with increased demand from families sidelined by the pandemic now face a new challenge — surging food prices and supply chain issues walloping the nation. The higher costs and limited availability mean some families may get smaller servings or substitutions for staples such as peanut butter, which costs nearly double what it did a year ago. As holidays approach, some food banks worry they won’t have enough stuffing and cranberry sauce for Thanksgiving and Christmas. “What happens when food prices go up is food insecurity for those who are experiencing it just gets worse,” said Katie Fitzgerald, chief operating officer of Feeding America, a nonprofit organization that coordinates the efforts of more than 200 food banks across the country.

Do look down: Scaling one of NYC's tallest skyscrapers

NEW YORK — As I climbed the narrow metal steps on the edge of the skyscraper, the safety harness that kept me attached to the building — nearly 1,300 feet up — kept clicking, like a roller-coaster heading toward its first drop. Looking around on a recent fall day, I could see New York City spread out below me in the early morning light. To the south, One World Trade Center appeared at eye level in the distance. To the east, the needle spire of the Empire State Building. To the west, as our guide, Anissa Barbato, pointed out, even New Jersey looked good. This was City Climb, an attraction that opened Tuesday at 30 Hudson Yards, one of the city's tallest buildings. It gives thrill-seekers a unique perspective on New York that no observation deck could hope to match: No walls, no glass windows, no railings. Just skyline. The $185-per-person experience starts with climbing groups of up to eight taken through a series of safety protocols, including a Breathalyzer test. They’re then outfitted in bright blue full body suits meant to ensure that nothing can fall off their person to the streets below.

Study: Fox viewers more likely to believe COVID falsehoods

People who trust Fox News Channel and other media outlets that appeal to conservatives are more likely to believe falsehoods about COVID-19 and vaccines than those who primarily go elsewhere for news, a study has found. While the Kaiser Family Foundation study released this week found the clear ties between news outlets that people trusted and the amount of misinformation they believe, it took no stand on whether those attitudes specifically came from what they saw there. “It may be because the people who are self-selecting these organizations believe (the misinformation) going in,” said Liz Hamel, vice president and director of public opinion and survey research at Kaiser.

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