Georgia Southern QB cleared of cocaine charges after contending white substance on car hood was 'bird poop'

Georgia Southern starting quarterback Shai Werts had charges of misdemeanor cocaine possession dropped on Thursday, one week after the 21-year-old argued with police officers over a white substance on his vehicle they said tested positive as cocaine. Werts contended it was "bird poop." Saluda County (S.C.) Deputy Solicitor Al Eargle told The Savannah Morning News that the substance confiscated could not be proven to be cocaine. South Carolina Law Enforcement Division tests revealed that no controlled substance was present on the samples taken from the hood of Werts' vehicle that was pulled over for speeding on July 31. — USA Today

Frontier Airlines offering free flights for people with the last name ‘Green' or ‘Greene'

If you’ve ever contemplated legally changing your name, now might be the time, because Frontier Airlines is offering free flights this month for anyone with the last name Green or Greene. The airline company is using the promotion to advocate for their “Green Week initiative.” Frontier says it is encouraging others to live greener with its sustainable giveaway for everyone with the last name Green or Greene. — Fox 5 Atlanta

Monsanto parent Bayer said to propose $8 billion settlement over Round Up claims

Monsanto parent company Bayer is said to be offering an $8 billion deal to settle about 18,000 claims that its weedkiller Roundup causes cancer. Shares of Bayer jumped ahead of the start of trade Friday on optimism that a settlement would end uncertainty about the chemical giant's liabilities. The offer is less than the $10 billion requested by lawyers representing consumers who claim their cancers were caused by glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup, according to Bloomberg News, which cited people familiar with the negotiations. It could take months to reach a deal, and there's no assurance the sides will come to an agreement, the publication added. — CBS News

West Nile virus cases rose in the US in 2018, killing 167 people

The number of West Nile virus cases rose across the United States last year, killing 167 people, according to data released Thursday by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Experts say the increase, while small, underscores the need to protect against mosquitoes during the hot summer months. There were 2,647 cases of West Nile virus last year, the CDC said, which is 550 more cases than the year before. The virus' most severe form — neuroinvasive disease, which can cause inflammation in the brain — was also more common last year than in years prior, according to the agency. — CNN

React to this story:

0
0
0
0
0