O’Rourke says he and wife descended from slave owners, has ‘more personal connection’ to slavery

Democratic presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke revealed on Twitter Sunday that he and his wife Amy are both descended from slave owners. “Something that we’ve been talking about in town hall meetings — the legacy of slavery in the United States — now has a much more personal connection,” O’Rourke said. “I was recently given documents showing that both Amy and I are descended from people who owned slaves.” O’Rourke included a link to a medium.com article he wrote titled “Rose and Eliza,” in reference to two slaves one his distance relatives owned. — Fox News

'Snakes and other critters' join flooding, tornadoes as Barry's latest threat

Hurricane Barry, quieted to a tropical depression Monday, remained a dangerous storm that threatened flooding, tornadoes and a new concern — snakes. Authorities in St. Tammany Parish, 50 miles north of New Orleans, said the area "may have dodged a bullet" when Barry gave the area only a glancing blow. But residents were urged to look for updates on social media. One of those was a post on Facebook. "If the area you live in has high water, watch out for snakes and other critters who are trying to escape the flood waters as well," the Fire Protection District warned. — USA Today

A Texas woman was living with her dead mother for three years

A 47-year-old Texas woman has been arrested after authorities discovered she and her daughter had been living in a house with her mother's corpse, police said. After finding skeletal remains in the residence, investigators believe Delissa Navonne Crayton's 71-year-old mother fell in 2016, hit her head and died a few days later while lying on the floor. According to police, the fall was non-life threatening, but Crayton did not provide adequate assistance to her mother. — CNN

Federal clampdown on Burning Man imperils festival's free spirit ethos, say Burners

Burning Man started three decades ago as a low-key gathering of friends who celebrated summer solstice on a West Coast beach by setting a wooden man aflame. Now, event organizers say the counterculture gathering of arts, music and communal living is eyeing attendance in the six figures, leading to a months-long struggle with federal regulators over whether its swelling size will cause long-term harm to the environment and even make the event vulnerable to a terrorist attack. The battle is heating up as Burning Man officials attempt to secure a new 10-year permit to allow the August gathering in Nevada's Black Rock Desert to jump from its current capacity of 80,000 to 100,000. But the Bureau of Land Management is clamping down. — NPR

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