Local deputy and K9 dog featured on TV show on Wednesday

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The episode of A&E's "America's Top Dog" featuring Todd Thompson, a Whitfield County Sheriff's Office deputy, and his K9 partner, Eddy, will air Wednesday night. 

To view the promo for "America's Top Dog," click here.

To watch a clip with of the show featuring Todd Thompson, a Whitfield County Sheriff's Office deputy, and his K9 partner, Eddy, click here.

The episode of "America's Top Dog" featuring Todd Thompson, a Whitfield County Sheriff's Office deputy, and his K9 partner, Eddy, will air Wednesday at 9 p.m., and Thompson said "it's hard to believe it is finally here."

The A&E network series premiered last month, and Thompson and Eddy filmed their portion of the show in California last summer.

"I'm very excited to finally sit down with surrounding support to watch myself and Eddy compete on the big screen," Thompson said. Since the process of the pair being on the show began nearly a year ago, "the outpouring of support from within the department and the community has been amazing."

In each one-hour episode of “America’s Top Dog,” four police K9 teams, including fan favorites from the hit series “Live PD,” and one civilian team face off for the title of “Top Dog," according to Cydney Schiller Prentice, director of publicity and communications for Babygrande PR, based in Santa Monica, California. Each week’s winning team earns $10,000 — with an additional $5,000 donated to the animal charity of their choice — and top competitors return to the finale course to battle for the title of “America’s Top Dog” (and an additional $25,000 cash prize) in the season's final episode.

Contestants are not permitted to offer "spoilers," but Thompson did say, "We did well."

Thompson is grateful his bosses allowed him and Eddy to do the series, as "this makes everyone look good," he explained in December. The show has even boosted Thompson's status under his own roof, as "my wife is my biggest fan, and my daughter thinks this is the neatest thing in the world."

Thompson, the lone officer in Whitfield County's K9 division, feels he and Eddy represent K9 units from around the country, and "this shows hard work pays off," he added. "I want him to be the best he can be, and we're very much at the top of our game."

On the show, "teams are tested on their speed, agility and teamwork by completing a series of expert tasks on a massive obstacle course," according to Ellen Wray, a publicity manager for A&E. Challenges range from navigating a complex maze for scented items to apprehending and taking down a suspect in a bite suit.

While many police dogs have names like "Killer," "Narco" or "Kilo," Thompson prefers Eddy because "it's more people-friendly," he explained last year. After all, in addition to sniffing for drugs, biting perpetrators and chasing criminals, Eddy joins Thompson for presentations at schools and other community events.

"I don't know if I could have accomplished any of this" with a different dog, Thompson continued. "Eddy is special."

"I'd like to personally thank everyone for their encouragement," Thompson said. Also, "a huge thank you to my department for allowing us to experience this truly amazing opportunity."

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