Want to help your child get into one of the nation’s most elite universities? Don’t be poor and white. Princeton University sociologist Thomas Espenshade looked at the admissions practices of eight elite universities over three years. He found that all of the schools discriminate heavily against whites and even more heavily against people of Asian descent and heavily in favor of blacks. For instance, to have the same chances of getting into one of these schools as a black student with an SAT score of 1,100, an otherwise identically situated Hispanic student would need an SAT score of 1,230, a white student would need an SAT score of 1,410 and an Asian student would need a 1,550 SAT score. Espenshade also found that coming from a poor family or a family with little education boosted the chances of admission for every racial group except whites. Being poor actually hurt a white student’s chances of admission. The richest white applicants were three times as likely to be admitted as the poorest whites with the same SAT scores and grades. Finally, he found that listing JROTC, FFA or 4-H on your resume hurts your chances of admission, and listing a leadership position or award from one of those groups pretty much guarantees you won’t be admitted.

Two state workers in Utah have been suspended and may face legal action for allegedly accessing state databases and illegally releasing the names, addresses and Social Security numbers of about 1,300 residents. The names were part of a list of alleged illegal aliens sent to law enforcement and media. But state officials say many of the Hispanics on the list are actually U.S. citizens or legal residents. Still, some anti-immigration groups have hailed those who released the information. William Gheen, president of Americans for Legal Immigration, called them “heroes.” And even though Utah Minuteman Project co-chair Eli Cawley admitted those who put the list together violated privacy laws, he said, “But I think in the interest of preserving our civilization, preserving our society, and protecting the people of the state of Utah, I think that’s a greater interest than protecting the privacy of some individuals.” So when they say “We want our laws obeyed” they don’t mean all of the laws.

In Canada, the Comox Valley Board of Education has ordered that the Lake Trail school yearbook be reprinted at the school system’s expense. A teacher at the school had clipped out the photograph of one boy from every copy but one of the yearbook, claiming the student had made a “hurtful and untrue” comment about the school’s principal in his biography in the yearbook. That prompted a huge outcry from parents and students. The student’s comment? He said the principal had spent “all our money on a new fence instead of textbooks.” School officials say that decision was made at the district level, not by the principal.

The John Cochran Veterans Administration Hospital in St. Louis has told 1,812 veterans they were exposed to HIV and hepatitis while undergoing dental work at the hospital. Hospital officials say workers did not properly clean and sterilize dental tools.

Concord, Mass., officials have banned the sale of bottled water starting in 2011. Town officials say they aren’t sure they actually have the legal authority to ban bottled water. But they say the measure will help the environment.

 

Two Census Bureau managers in Brooklyn, N.Y., have been fired after officials found they faked more than 10,000 household surveys.

Charles Oliver is a staff writer for The Daily Citizen. Got a suggestion for It Couldn’t Happen Here? E-mail it to him at charlesoliver@daltoncitizen.com.

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