Fourteen foreign trade agreements provided the United States with 14 trade deficits and the loss of millions of jobs. That’s where we stand right now. If we knew then what we know now, you say, we would have made some different decisions with regard to globalism. And you would be wrong.

You might say it’s hard to explain how the American worker, who for years and years, even decades, was recognized as the most productive worker in the world, is now among the unemployed. And you would be wrong.

You might say it’s a mystery as to how Wall Street can be so prosperous while at the same time Main Street struggles so hard to keep small businesses from closing their doors, and good, hard-working families are losing their homes due to foreclosures. And you would be wrong.

You might believe that major American manufacturing corporations have a commitment to the economic vitality of America, the source of their initial financial success. And you would be wrong.

With political leaders, from the mayor of the city of Dalton to the president of the United States, promoting more and more jobs, you would think there would soon be a substantial improvement in the jobs situation. And you would be wrong.

The plan was simple: Technology was to pass from America through the door of a foreign trade agreement to another country where an American manufacturing corporation would place that technology previously used by an American worker — at a cost, let’s say, of $40 per hour — into the hands of a foreign worker — at a cost, let’s say, of $40 per week.

The simple plan worked.

Sanford E. Dover

Dalton

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