Letter: Cleanup of Dalton State trails is appreciated

We are writing this letter of thanks to all the volunteers who recently gave their time and talents to rehabilitating the hiking trails at Dalton State College. These volunteers cut trees, limbs, put out sand, filled in holes, cleaned up the vegetation and foliage and many other things I know I am not mentioning. We so enjoyed our recent hike and noticed all the work that had been done since we had hiked it the last time. Cascade Falls, and the other streams and creeks that flow through this beautiful area, were moving in full force and the sounds were like music. The dogwoods were in bloom, the birds were chirping and all in all, it was just a perfect day for this great hike.

If you have not hiked there here is a little information regarding the trails. You can view a map and all the information about the trails at www.daltonstate.edu/resources_for/roadrunner-trail-system.cms.

According to the site: "The three-mile trail system on the side of Rocky Face Ridge was developed by Dalton State faculty, staff and students led by biology professor Dr. John Lugthart, and is used for both instructional and recreational purposes. It is open for campus and community use with entry and exit points all along the Roadrunner Trail System (RTS). Kiosks, each featuring a map, mark the four trailheads. The moderately difficult trails are appropriate for hikers of all ages. They are blazed and include benches from which hikers can sit and enjoy the views. Interpretive signs help identify flora and fauna along the way.

"The half-mile Big Rock Trail originates from a trailhead located near Dalton State's athletics field and presents the RTS's steepest climb. The Big Rock Trail connects to the one-mile long College Creek Trail (trailheads across George Rice Drive from Bandy Gym and the Pope Student Center) which features a headwater stream that runs from the ridge through the campus behind Roberts Library. The Cascade Trail branches off of the north end of the College Creek Trail and runs 1.5 miles, terminating at the Brown Center parking lot. Near the north end of the Cascade Trail a short side path leads to the picturesque cascade for which the trail is named."

We hope you will find this adventure as exciting as we did. Get out your hiking boots, a couple of bottles of water and head for the trails. Please don't forget your camera (or phone). Enjoy!

Judy Bird

Sandra Newberry

Whitfield County

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