Letter: Presentation matters in delivery of news

There has been some discussion about whether mainstream media is guilty of propagating "fake news." The AP story on the front of your April 19 edition regarding the release of the Mueller report is, in my opinion, a perfect example of what some of us consider fake news.

There is nothing in the article that is factually incorrect. Yet the writer spends the first eight paragraphs describing how President Trump attempted to interfere with the special counsel's investigation before reporting that the investigation could not prove obstruction. Further, the story is laid out in such a way that the reader has to turn to the back of the sports page to find out that fact. Unless one reads carefully and fully, it is easy to come away with the impression that there was obstruction.

This story is an example of how even factual information can be presented in a way that is intended to sway the reader's opinion. That kind of writing should be reserved for the editorial page. To include it in a news story creates the impression that the writer and the paper are biased, and thus engaging in fake news designed to make the object of the story look bad.

Jennifer Weyman

Chatsworth

React to this story:

0
0
0
0
0

Recommended for you